Educators and Related Service Providers




School Environment


Schedules


First Then Template

  • A First-Then Schedule presents what the individual needs to do now (first) and what he/she will do next (then). Usually the FIRST is a non or less preferred activity followed by the THEN which is a highly preferred activity.
    • Examples: First – Math assignment, Then – Lunch or  First – Math assignment, Then – Legos

First-Next-Then Template

  • A First-Next-Then Schedule can be used to facilitate up to 3 transitions. This support can also be used to break down a complex task into steps.
    • Examples: First – PE, Next – Speech, Then – PE or  First – PE, Next – Speech, Then – Computer game

Daily Schedule Template

  • A Daily Schedule shows the individual a sequence of tasks or activities for the day or a specific student. Some may need individual schedules in a format that will meet their needs and address daily schedule changes.
    • Noting any therapy sessions with a visual of that person or elective changes each day.
      • Speech with Ms. Amy – Monday at 9:30 AM
      • Monday – PE, Tuesday – Art, Wednesday – Music, Thursday – Theater, Friday – Computer

Weekly Schedule Template

  • A Weekly Schedule shows the individual a visual representation of what their schedule will look like for the week. This will allow the individual to anticipate events ahead of time and plan for any changes noted in their schedule.
    • Noting any major schedule changes that would interrupt their routine.
      • Early dismissals
      • Holiday breaks
      • Class parties/celebrations
      • School assemblies

Interactive Activity Schedule Template

  • This Interactive Activity Schedule can be used to break the task down into smaller, more manageable components and sequence out the steps of the activity. When laminated or inserted into a clear sheet protector, the individual can use a dry erase marker to mark completion for each task and note their preferred reinforcer at the bottom of the support.
    • Example: Morning Arrival
      1. Walk to desk
      2. Unpack school bag
      3. Hang school bag on back of desk
      4. Place homework in homework basket on teacher’s desk
      5. Sharpen pencil
      6. Return to desk
      7. Get out math notebook
      8. Working For: Preferred Book

To Do/All Done Template

  • A To Do/All Done support can be used to help the individual organize their time or break down the steps of a difficult task. It’s a visual way to show the individual all of the things they accomplished and what they have left to do.
    • Example: Computer Lab – 1. Enter lab and find assigned computer, 2. Set visual timer for 30 minutes, 3. Put on headphones, 4. Log on to computer

Change Alert Template

  • A Change Alert visual can be used to reflect any changes in the daily schedule or individual routine. This is a priming strategy that will help the individual learn how to be flexible and accept change.
    • Examples: Instead of: Outdoor Recess, We will: Play in Centers or  Instead of: Pizza for lunch, We will: Eat sandwiches or chicken nuggets

Transition Supports

Transition Countdown Visual

  • A Visual Countdown Timer can be used to support transitions by serving as a visual warning that the preferred activity is about to end. You could use a clothespin, arrow, or visual of the activity (inside of the colored circles) to help the individual understand the amount of time they have left.
    • Examples: Transitioning off of the iPad/computer, outdoor recess, centers, engaging in a preferred activity, etc.

5 Minute Countdown Visual

  • A 5 Minute Countdown can be used to show the individual a visual representation of how many minutes they have left of a preferred or non-preferred activity. You could use a clothespin, arrow, or visual of the activity (inside of the white boxes below each number) to help the individual understand when they need to stop.

Behavior


Expectations


Classwide Expectations

  • Classwide Expectations should provide individuals with a visual representation of what the routine/procedure should look like and sound like throughout the day.
    • Examples: Transitions, bathroom, lunch, arrival, dismissal, centers, etc.

Individual Expectations

  • Individual Expectations remind the student of the rules/expectations you expect him or her to follow. The individual support can be used at any time to remind and help the individual to sequence the steps within the routine/procedure.
    • Examples: Sitting on the rug, raising hand to participate, switching classes

Positive Behavior Strategies

Token Economy System

  • A Token Economy System can be used to teach new skills or reinforce appropriate behaviors. This support can be used to work on academics, behavior, communication, social, or self-help goals.

Self-Management

Class Discussion Visual Support

  • The Class Discussion Visual is an effective classroom management strategy to maximize instructional time and decrease blurting out behaviors by giving the students time to process questions and facilitate choral responses. This tool will also help the individual manage their own behavior during classroom instruction.

Taking Deep Breaths

  • The Taking Deep Breaths card is a visual tool that gives the individual something to focus on while he/she works to calm their breathing following a difficult situation. When using this support, the individual would manage their breathing by counting the number of breaths by moving the small visual icons to the card.

Calm Down Choice Board

  • A Calm Down Choice Board is a visual tool that provides two or more possible choices that the individual can choose from to help them calm down in appropriate ways. This is also a helpful tool for individuals with limited communication skills.

Communication


Communication Boards


A communication board is a support with symbols or pictures that is used to facilitate communication for individuals with limited expressive language. This support can also help the individual understand and comprehend spoken and written language. Below are a few examples of the different types of communication boards that could be used in the school setting to support students with disabilities.


Communication Board – Feelings (Basic)

Communication Board – Feelings (Advanced)

  • A Feelings Board can be used to help the individual express how they are feeling during different situations.

Communication Board – Learning and Participation (Basic)

Communication Board – Learning and Participation (Advanced)

  • A Learning and Participation Board can be used to promote understanding with grade level content and provide the student with an alternative form of communication to participate during class discussion.

Visual Cue Cards

Help Cue Cards

  • A Help Visual Cue Card can be used to give the individual a way to express their need for help.

Yes/No Cue Cards

  • A Yes/No Cue Card can be used to give the individual a way to respond to a simple question with a yes or no response.

Break Cue Cards

  • A Break Cue Card can be used to give the individual a way to express the need for a break when they start to feel anxious or frustrated.

Scripting

Scripting – Interactions (Pre-K)

Scripting – Asking for Help (Elementary, Middle, High)

  • Scripting provides support in the form of words and/or pictures for a individual to model appropriate communication and guides interaction with and responding to an appropriate communication partner. A scripting visual provides the individual the phrase to say, during different situations, to help them communicate their wants or needs when initiating a conversation.

Social Interaction


Social Conversation


Greeting Another Person

  • A Greeting task analysis will break down the skill of saying hello to a familiar person or introducing yourself to an unfamiliar person. Some individuals may need visuals to learn this skill, while other may only need written words.

Initiating a Conversation

  • An Initiating a Conversation task analysis will break down the skill of starting a conversation about a shared topic. Some individuals may need visuals to learn this skill, while other may only need written words.

Ending a Conversation

  • An Ending a Conversation task analysis will break down the skill of terminating a conversation when you run out of things to say or have other plans. Some individuals may need visuals to learn this skill, while other may only need written words.

Social Interaction

Turn Taking Visual

  • A Taking Turns visual can be used to facilitate interactions with more than one person during an activity or conversation. This support provides the individual with a visual cue of whose turn it is and helps them understand how turn-taking works.

Waiting Visuals

  • A Wait Card visual is used to teach the concept of waiting during activities and interactions. When using the wait card, provide the visual to the individual and give a verbal direction (example: “wait” or “you are waiting for…”). When the individual’s wait time has expired, remove the card and provide specific positive praise for waiting. Immediately following positive praise,  allow the individual to participate in the activity or interaction. Some wait cards are time-sensitive, and you may see a few boxes beneath the word “wait.” Place a checkmark in each of these boxes as the individual is waiting. These checkmarks will allow the individual to visualize an end in sight to the wait time.
    • Example: Using this support to show the individual to WAIT their turn to speak during instruction or waiting to get lunch in the cafeteria.

Expectations: Kind and Respectful Language

  • Setting expectations for positive interactions, such as using Kind and Respectful Language, will provide individuals with a visual representation of what is expected when interacting appropriately with another person.